angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
  1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
  2. Times Square, 1947
  3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
  4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
  5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
  6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945 
  7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
  8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
  9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
  10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935

(via lee-enfeel)

robynb12:

sorayachemaly:

Trigger Warning
Image Credit” UniteWomen.Org
In 2005, 19-year old army private LaVena Johnson,  was the first woman from Missouri to die in Iraq, according to the Army, of suicide. Only after her family insisted on seeing photographs taken at the scene of her death did they realize she was found in her tent with a gunshot wound to the head, a broken nose, black eye, loose teeth, acid burns on her genitals (there is speculation that this was done to cover up possible sexual assault), and a trail of blood leading away from her tent. The army ruled that her death was a SUICIDE.  Her father, a doctor who has worked with military personnel for more than 20 years, believes his daughter was raped and murdered.  A documentary, “LaVena Johnson The Silent Truth,” their attempts to uncover the truth was released in 2010. There is a website with updates, LaVena Johnson and a petition asking Senator Claire McCaskill to investigate her death. As Cilla McCain, founder of Military Families for Justice asks, would this case by taken seriously if LaVena Johnson were not a black woman? Her parents have established a scholarship fund in their daughter’s name. Donations can be made to The LaVena L. Johnson College Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 117, Florissant, MO 63032 

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robynb12:

sorayachemaly:

Trigger Warning

Image Credit” UniteWomen.Org

In 2005, 19-year old army private LaVena Johnson,  was the first woman from Missouri to die in Iraq, according to the Army, of suicide. Only after her family insisted on seeing photographs taken at the scene of her death did they realize she was found in her tent with a gunshot wound to the head, a broken nose, black eye, loose teeth, acid burns on her genitals (there is speculation that this was done to cover up possible sexual assault), and a trail of blood leading away from her tent. The army ruled that her death was a SUICIDE.  Her father, a doctor who has worked with military personnel for more than 20 years, believes his daughter was raped and murdered.  A documentary, LaVena Johnson The Silent Truth,” their attempts to uncover the truth was released in 2010. There is a website with updates, LaVena Johnson and a petition asking Senator Claire McCaskill to investigate her death. As Cilla McCain, founder of Military Families for Justice asks, would this case by taken seriously if LaVena Johnson were not a black woman? Her parents have established a scholarship fund in their daughter’s name. Donations can be made to The LaVena L. Johnson College Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 117, Florissant, MO 63032 

Donate and boost

(via lillabet)

anunreliablesource:

sleepy-socialist:

vivelamours:

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011), Göran Hugo Olsson

You heard it right folks, the FBI considered free breakfasts for poor children to be the most dangerous internal threat to the country. Literally the kind of thing Jesus would do was the most dangerous threat to the country.

Looks like I have a research project for the day, I have a great interest in reading about this on all levels.

(via lillabet)

thinksquad:

om the moment Los Angeles police handcuffed him, Jorge Azucena told officers he needed help.

"I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe," he pleaded. "I have asthma, I have asthma."

In the half-hour or so after his arrest late one night last September, Azucena said over and over that he was struggling for breath. Numerous LAPD officers and sergeants heard his pleas for medical attention but ignored them even as his condition visibly worsened.

"You can breathe just fine," one sergeant told him. "You can talk, so you can breathe."

Azucena could not walk or stand by the time officers brought him to a South Los Angeles police station for booking. So they carried him into a cell, leaving him lying face-down on the floor. He was soon unconscious. When paramedics arrived shortly after, Azucena’s heart had stopped.

The chilling account of how Azucena died is told in two reports made public this week. After a Times article last year on the circumstances surrounding Azucena’s death, the reports offer new details into the man’s desperate and futile attempts to convince officers his lungs were succumbing to what coroner’s officials determined was most likely an asthma attack.

Nearly a year after Azucena’s death, LAPD officials have not yet determined whether any of the officers involved that night should be disciplined for failing to summon help and, in the case of some officers, for lying to investigators. Nine officers and two sergeants are the subjects of ongoing internal investigations, while another sergeant under scrutiny recently retired, said Capt. Paul Snell, who commands the LAPD’s Southwest Division, where the death occurred. As is customary, prosecutors from the county district attorney’s office are reviewing the case to determine whether the inaction amounts to criminal behavior.

"There should not be any question that when somebody in custody is heard to say ‘I cannot breathe,’ the officers should promptly call for an ambulance," said Robert Saltzman, a member of the Police Commission that oversees the LAPD.

Through a spokesman, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck declined to comment.

http://www.latimes.com/local/crime/la-me-lapd-custody-death-20140823-story.html#page=1

(via lillabet)